Top Quality French Carp Fishing

NEW Lake Record caught on 26th. April 2017 at 76lb 15oz

120 -150 different carp of 40lb. or bigger inc. 41 + different 50lb. plus carp

and 6 different 60lb plus carp And 2 known 70lb plus carp.



Copyright ©2016:2017 Moorlands Fisheries - All Rights Reserved

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Contact Keith direct on keith@moorlandfisheries.co.uk or by telephone on 07500 877804


To contact  Sharon or any of the Moorlands team direct phone 0033 385 922 953.


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Moorland Fisheries Registered Address:  Flat 30. 18-22 Addiscombe Grove. Croydon. Surrey. CR0 5LL

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Read Ian MacMillans review of his last trip to Moorlands




2017 has been a year of incredible highs and hard work, plus research, achieving successes beyond our dreams.

The year began with the strangest of weather systems. We saw temperatures in late December 2016 that suggested another mild winter. January had other ideas and the lake had a very thick lid of ice for most of the month. In fact it was so thick that I walked out onto it, in front of the lodge, and walked along to Second Pontoon without it even creaking. Luckily, we left the aerators running 24/7 and they kept four large areas clear of ice. With those areas clear any gasses were able to escape and the water remained in good condition.


February saw another complete change and, some days, we were working in tee shirts. The upshot of this was that we were able to start on the weed control much earlier than planned.

Last year Alan and I (more Alan in truth) spent 75 days each trying to cut and remove the weed and that was just to try to keep the swims fishable. At no stage did we ever get on top of it but we did become aware of some of its growth characteristics. Let me explain. In previous years, as the weed developed in each swim, we began by cutting lanes through it to allow anglers to be able to fish along those lanes and sink their lines. We noticed that, as the weed started again, some of those previously cut lanes remained much clearer than the areas of weed that we had cut later in the year. This tied in with our previous research that suggested that it was essential to control and remove the weed very early on and, thereby, stop it setting seeds. We decided to start very early this year and to go back over the same areas as regularly as needed to stop the weed getting established. In short, our plans worked better than we expected and our season progressed with just very small patches of weed and, as it is a very early season plant, these patches gradually disappeared and were gone by mid summer. 

We now wait to see the long term results of this work and I will try to guess some of what has happened so far. I say "guess" because it is impossible for us to know exactly what happens on the lake bed. However, the one certainty is that the carp were much more mobile, didn't necessarily mean that they were easier to catch but they definitely kept on the move. 

I think that the removal of the weed meant that the food items normally held therein, snails, slaters etc. were now on the lake bed. With it being the first year without weed, it appeared that there was a mountain of free food available crawling through the soft clay. The reason for me saying that is that we were watching numerous patches of bubbles and mud from feeding fish in areas that hadn't been baited by anglers. The problem was that these feeding patches were totally random. The fish would dip down and feed for a couple of minutes before moving off to another spot and rarely returned to any of the previous spots. I honestly believe that this situation will change and improve if we continue to keep on top of the weed. I also believe that the carp will gradually mop up this larder much earlier each year.

Another big advantage is that this natural larder will produce bigger, fitter fish and the lack of weed at least allows us to enjoy the battle with these big fish in open water, rather than having to wade or boat out to net them.

Now let me also add some "food for thought". We know carp have an amazing olfactory sense, call it taste or smell or whatever, they can detect food items which give off very small amounts of amino acid triggers. However, if there are literally millions of bloodworm, snail etc. all giving off their individual signal, the combination of that must be huge. My question is now how do we go about competing against that attraction? Is it by glugged baits, overflavoured baits, big beds of bait or is there another trick that we are missing?


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Chapter 15 - 2017 The year of Highs