Top Quality French Carp Fishing

NEW Lake Record caught on 26th. April 2017 at 76lb 15oz

120 -150 different carp of 40lb. or bigger inc. 41 + different 50lb. plus carp

and 6 different 60lb plus carp And 2 known 70lb plus carp.



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Contact Keith direct on keith@moorlandfisheries.co.uk or by telephone on 07500 877804


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Read Ian MacMillans review of his last trip to Moorlands

The treatment of a selected area is quite easy if the boat is rowed across the lake from one bank to another in 'lanes' a few yards apart, with lime being scattered into the water as the boat progresses. Distributed in this way, the turbulence caused by the boat ensures that the lime dissolves and disperses quickly. For reasons of practicality, it is preferable if the lime can be obtained in sacks and shaken onto the water from the part-opened bags.

If the liming is carried out on a trial basis initially and the effects are monitored, further lime introductions could be undertaken in subsequent years. In any event, it is most important that no more than about a quarter of the area of the lake is treated at any one time. The temporary fluctuation in the pH may be considerable, although this becomes stabilised within a few weeks.

It is recommended that a period of at least three or four weeks elapse between applications if a larger area were to be treated. Fish catches in the treated areas may be poor for a few weeks following lime applications, although this will be of little consequence if the work is carried out in the winter months, when few anglers may be fishing."



Right, back to the season. The weather continued to keep us guessing as temperatures went up and down like a whores drawers but the one constant across the spring was lack of rain. In fact that continued for the whole year and, even as I type this (late November) we are still only seeing light showers. In fact this is helping me with the work but more of that later.

The main effect of the fluctuating temperatures was that the fish were a bit later spawning and that gave the anglers more chance of catching them at their best, and boy did we see a few "bests"?


By mid March we had cut down and logged up the dead oaks on the dam wall and near the stock pond and, as the first proper week still had a couple of spaces I managed to sneak in a few days to angle. I managed to fluke out a few but 48lbs was my biggest. However, I did also hit another milestone as that was also my 300th carp over 40lbs. 


The beginning of April still produced poor results as far as numbers of big fish were concerned but we were really delighted to see Cut Tail banked at 74lbs 10 oz. A new lake record and in mint condition. It was encouraging to hear so many anglers commenting about just how hard the fish were fighting and how pleasant it was to be able to play them in much more open water than previous years when we still had the thick weed. We also saw Clover banked at 56lbs 10oz which was a bit lower than I had hoped for. She has gone up and down considerably over the last few years and I think she may now have reached her best weight when she topped 60lbs. Only time will tell.


As April continued the fish remained addicted to their natural food supply. We were seeing dozens of feeding carp. Patches of bubbles coming up. Clouds of mud being stirred up. Huge carp head and shouldering and so many carp crashing out during the night that it was difficult to sleep. Several of the carp were being caught on corn over beds of hemp but the boilies that had done well up till now just weren't drawing the fish in. I even tested and sieved some of the clay from the lake bed and it held all the expected culprits' bloodworm, slaters, cadis, snails, plus a larger mud worm that looked like a small brandling. No wonder the carp didn't need our baits!




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