Top Quality French Carp Fishing

NEW Lake Record caught on 26th. April 2017 at 76lb 15oz

120 -150 different carp of 40lb. or bigger inc. 41 + different 50lb. plus carp

and 6 different 60lb plus carp And 2 known 70lb plus carp.



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Contact Keith direct on keith@moorlandfisheries.co.uk or by telephone on 07500 877804


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Rules amended 08/06/17

Moorland Fisheries Registered Address:  Flat 30. 18-22 Addiscombe Grove. Croydon. Surrey. CR0 5LL

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Chapter Six - The Long Hot Summer


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We had now drifted into the 2002/3 winter and were keenly awaiting the improvement in weather conditions. The temperature in December 2002 dropped suddenly but France did not see the bitingly cold winds that everyone in England was complaining about. During mild spells it was still possible to watch bubbles being created by feeding carp. The lake had changed slightly because we had raised the level of the overflow spillway by about ten inches and this had resulted in another couple of million gallons in the lake.

The end result of this was that the water level amongst the reed and sedge margins was considerably deeper and, in turn, this gave us another opportunity for further improvement. As the water level had risen it had formed pockets within the reed stems and we decided to use these pockets as small organism nurseries.

The river Saone is only some twenty minutes from our lake and during the warmer months it teems with shrimp and small mussels. It was a simple job to take a fine mesh net to the river and simply by scooping it was possible to collect thousands of shrimps. By rolling over large stones and sunken logs we also collected masses of slaters which lived on, and thereby helped to break down, rotting vegetation.

Once collected, all these small aquatic insects were spread around within the “new” water pockets and they seemed relatively safe and would prove to be very proficient at reproducing and filling the void of small food items. They immediately provided a high-protein, living diet which I was convinced would benefit the carp.

During my years of keeping koi carp in England I had become aware of the benefits of live food. Whenever I had seen fish which appeared to be unwell I had often seen them make almost miraculous recoveries as soon as they were offered maggots or worms or live shrimps.

I felt that a permanent supply “on tap” so to speak would allow them to maintain good condition whenever they felt the need. It was also immediately obvious that we would need to replace these larders after every single vidange.

With all the small fish removed the appearance of the lake immediately changed. During the winter of 2001 the lake had remained “turbid” with suspended silt and sand. I could remember remarking to my wife that it was probably being caused by the feeding actions of numerous small fish.

However I had had absolutely no idea just how many small fish we had been looking at. As already described, the shoals of small fish must have been vast and would have been having a detrimental effect on the entire ecology system of the lake.

The previous owners were not anglers and had no experience in fishery management so had taken all their advice from the local fish farmer. He had evidently seen the lake as a suitable stock pond which he could ram full of every type of fish and reap the benefit every two years at the vidanges.

In fact it would have been necessary to keep on with the vidanges because of the numbers of fish present so it was almost self perpetuating.