Top Quality French Carp Fishing

NEW Lake Record caught on 26th. April 2017 at 76lb 15oz

120 -150 different carp of 40lb. or bigger inc. 41 + different 50lb. plus carp

and 6 different 60lb plus carp And 2 known 70lb plus carp.



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Chapter Three - All Part of the Dream


I was convinced that one of the pc’s had hung itself and decided to leave it until after I had answered the call of nature. I then picked up the rod to wind in the offending fish when all hell broke loose. That is a good description of what happened next.

The carp in my lake had already gained a name for being extremely hard fighting fish and I must say that they are the strongest carp that I have ever caught. It turned out to be a twenty four pounder which must have been hooked for at least fifteen minutes without ever moving far enough to pull the line from the clip. Had that happened in England I would have put it down to constant angling pressure and the carp’s ability to “learn”. “It knew it was hooked and was trying to deal with the hook.”

Well this fish had never been hooked before in its life so what was happening? Did it continue to feed or did it feel the tension and decide not to pull against it? Whatever the answer, this would not turn out to be an isolated case. Almost every angler reported experiencing “twitchy” bites which would eventually turn out to be carp.

One angler revealed that he had seen his bobbin rise to the rod just into dark one night. He decided that he didn’t want to disturb the bait because it would be difficult to get the rod exactly back onto his baited patch in the dark. He waited for the run to develop but eventually drifted off to sleep. His other two rods produced fish during the night but the original rod remained silent until he wound in for breakfast. As soon as he picked up the rod it exploded into action and he landed a twenty seven pound mirror.

That fish definitely didn’t continue feeding and must have lain motionless all night. How long would it have stayed like that?

Does this mean that some fish simply don’t pull against tension and if this is the case then any form of being tethered could result in them just sitting there until they die? The experiences that I encountered during my “hands on fishery management experience” had produced even more questions to be answered.

In May 2002 our first guests arrived and despite bursts of feeding activity from the pc’s they stuck to their boilie approach and caught sixty three carp. By this time we were still trying to work out the best presentations. The margins to about twenty yards out are firm sandy clay and a critically balance bait or short pop-up produced the goods.

The centre areas are soft clay and silt and despite trying pop-ups over these areas I have failed to get them to work. In fact, I have watched carp move on to baited patches and produce plumes of bubbles where they are devouring the bait while ignoring the pop ups.

As a test I decided to fish two tigers over a big bed of maize, chick peas, pellets and broken boilies and, low and behold, the first bite that evening produced a truly gorgeous looking carp and at thirty one pounds, my first thirty from my own lake.

As far as I was concerned I had cracked it. The carp were feeding in the silt and a pop up was being missed because it was above them.










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